Difference between revisions of "Chapter 6"

 
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{{CL49 PbP Text}}
 
{{CL49 PbP Text}}
  
a: 139, b: 114 - '''Edna Mosh'''<br>
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a: ???, b: 120 - '''Humbert Humbert'''<br>
Mucho Maas deliberately distorts the sound of his wife's name to compensate for the [http://www.nutshellhifi.com/library/tinyhistory1.html distortions] of [http://www.tangentsunset.com/laradiohistory.htm AM radio] in the mid-sixties.
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Humbert Humbert is the narrator and main character in Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" (1955)
  
a: 143, b: 117 - '''She Loves You'''<br>
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[[Image:columbian_stamp.jpg|thumb|150px|right|15 cent Columbian Exposition Issue, 1893]]
  
The Beatles third single, first issued in the U.S. on the obscure '''Swan''' label.
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[[Image:mothers_stamp.jpg|thumb|150px|right|3 cent Mothers of America Issue, 1934]]
  
See: [[She_Loves_You_And_More|'''She Loves You And More''']]
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[[Image:centenary_stamp.jpg|thumb|150px|right|Postage Stamp Centenary Issue, 1947]]
  
a: ???, b: 121 - '''Humbert Humbert'''<br>
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[[Image:statue-of-liberty_stamp.jpg|thumb|150px|right|3 cent Statue of Liberty, 1954]]
Humbert Humbert is the narrator and main character in Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" (1955)
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 +
[[Image:brussels_stamp.jpg|thumb|150px|right|3 cent Brussels Exhibition Issue, 1958]]
  
a: 151, b: 124 - '''K. da chingado'''<br>
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b: 123 - '''riparian'''<br>
''Chingado'' is Spanish slang meaning "fucker."
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Relating to or living or located on the bank of a natural watercourse.
  
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b: 124 - '''Bowdlerized'''<br>
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Thomas Bowdler published a version of Shakespeare that removed profanity and sexual references in an effort to be more appropriate for audiences of his time.  Since then, the term 'bowdlerize' generally refers to censorship of offensive material from artistic works.
  
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a: 151, b: 124 - '''K. da chingado'''<br>
 +
''Chingado'' is Spanish slang meaning "fucker."
  
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b: 126 - '''taken a Brody'''<br>
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Steve Brodie [sic] was a New York City bookie who claimed to have survived the 135 foot jump from the Brooklyn Bridge in 1886.  The notoriety surrounding this story is the source of phrases such as "pull a Brodie" or "take a Brodie."  As Driblette's walk into the Pacific was fatal and did not include a fall from a great height, Oedipa's appropriation of the expression is forced at best.
  
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b: 127 - '''poetaster'''<br>
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An inferior poet; a writer of insignificant or shoddy poetry.
  
  
 
{{CL49 PbP}}
 
{{CL49 PbP}}

Latest revision as of 19:31, 7 May 2010

Please keep these annotations SPOILER-FREE by not revealing information from later pages in the novel.
If your edition has 183 pages, follow the pages marked a: 49a.jpg 49b.jpg If your edition has 152 pages,
follow b:
49c.jpg

a: ???, b: 120 - Humbert Humbert
Humbert Humbert is the narrator and main character in Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" (1955)

15 cent Columbian Exposition Issue, 1893
3 cent Mothers of America Issue, 1934
Postage Stamp Centenary Issue, 1947
3 cent Statue of Liberty, 1954
3 cent Brussels Exhibition Issue, 1958

b: 123 - riparian
Relating to or living or located on the bank of a natural watercourse.

b: 124 - Bowdlerized
Thomas Bowdler published a version of Shakespeare that removed profanity and sexual references in an effort to be more appropriate for audiences of his time. Since then, the term 'bowdlerize' generally refers to censorship of offensive material from artistic works.

a: 151, b: 124 - K. da chingado
Chingado is Spanish slang meaning "fucker."

b: 126 - taken a Brody
Steve Brodie [sic] was a New York City bookie who claimed to have survived the 135 foot jump from the Brooklyn Bridge in 1886. The notoriety surrounding this story is the source of phrases such as "pull a Brodie" or "take a Brodie." As Driblette's walk into the Pacific was fatal and did not include a fall from a great height, Oedipa's appropriation of the expression is forced at best.

b: 127 - poetaster
An inferior poet; a writer of insignificant or shoddy poetry.



Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6
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